minor league – NY Renegades http://nyrenegades.com/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 13:41:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://nyrenegades.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/ny.png minor league – NY Renegades http://nyrenegades.com/ 32 32 Ryan Zimmerman talks future and retirement at Nationals spring training https://nyrenegades.com/ryan-zimmerman-talks-future-and-retirement-at-nationals-spring-training/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 12:37:48 +0000 https://nyrenegades.com/ryan-zimmerman-talks-future-and-retirement-at-nationals-spring-training/ One day, he might visit the Nationals’ lower Class A affiliate in Fredericksburg, a short drive from his home in Northern Virginia. Another day, he might stop by the team’s TV or radio booth to see what he’s thinking. The club’s first draft pick spoke to a large group of minor leaguers in the morning […]]]>

One day, he might visit the Nationals’ lower Class A affiliate in Fredericksburg, a short drive from his home in Northern Virginia. Another day, he might stop by the team’s TV or radio booth to see what he’s thinking. The club’s first draft pick spoke to a large group of minor leaguers in the morning on Wednesday, then spent nearly half an hour chatting with a few reporters.

Here are some excerpts from that last conversation. The questions and answers have been slightly edited for clarity.

Q: Do you have any idea what the personal services contract might look like?

A: I have personal home service right now. This is my biggest contract. [He and his wife, Heather, recently welcomed their fourth child.] But I will always be involved in this organization. I think I’ll try a bit of everything. Talking and working with minor league kids. Stay in touch with the big league guys. Talk to coaches. Who knows – maybe do some TV stuff. Just a little over the next few years, kind of trying a bunch of things and seeing if some of them work, if I’m good at some of them and go from there.

Q: Did the national championships that began a rebuild in July help you make your decision to retire?

A: I said when I followed the process, like where is the organization, where is the team, where is the big league team, it was 100% [part of the decision]. … But I think what they did in the last two weeks gave them a chance. I don’t mean to be competitive, because that’s one thing [General Manager Mike Rizzo] has always done. Whatever you want to call it…a rebuild, whatever cool thing to say now, you know, whatever cool thing teams use as an excuse to lose, I’ve known Mike for a long time, and he doesn’t isn’t good at that kind of stuff. They came out and signed Nelson Cruz, you know what I mean? It’s not a bad team. If they stay healthy they have a chance to win a few games I think. You can’t predict the future, obviously. I made my decision before a lot of these things happened. It was part of the decision. I wouldn’t say it was like 100% or anything. I think the biggest part of the decision was: am I willing to put in all the time it takes to stay healthy, be able to produce and display the numbers and get the job done in a way that I somehow hold myself responsible for? In the end, it was rather the tipping point.

Q: Well, you were never a big fan of spring training.

A: No, no, it’s very overrated. This is for pitchers! Spring training is for pitchers – it is. They are the most important people anyway.

Q: But now that you’re here, you itching to get dressed to play?

A: No. Heather asked me last night. She was like, “Was it weird to go out there and not have to take ground balls or hit BP?” I didn’t really know. It was kind of nice, so I think that kind of confirmed my decision for me, which is good. But it’s nice to be there, living in DC so I can go in and out and get some kind of baseball fix. Talk about the game, talk with the coaches. Talking with the minor league kids was amazing, so much fun this morning. … I can get what I need out of it in terms of being involved in the game without having to work my right hip for 45 minutes in the morning to not blow out my left oblique. I don’t miss that kind of stuff. It’s damn good, to be honest with you.

Q: Did the lockout influence your decision to retire?

A: No no no. … I wish we had a lockout every year and missed spring training. That would be great. I’m not talking about a lockout every year. It sounded bad. Or I could have just pulled one [Zack] Greinke and show up on the day you are supposed to show up. I guess I should have. I could have done it every year. He’s a better man than me! … I’m glad it was done. You know, you never want to see this stuff happen. But sometimes it has to happen. There are many things that change every five years; there have been many things that have changed in the last 20 or 30 years that have not been addressed. But at the end of the day, I think everyone just wants to play baseball. The players want to play, the owners want to play, the fans obviously want us to play. It’s never pretty when it happens. But the games will be played and I hope people forget about it. I never understood why they don’t start working on the next one [collective bargaining agreement] now. I feel like we’re still looking back to the previous year and saying, “Oh no, we ran out of time.”

Q: Will you be at the opening?

A: It’s a good question. What day is it? Is it a Thursday? Four hours? Uh…maybe. My daughter practices lacrosse on Thursdays. It’s a good thing too – I can come anytime, I can go see a game, I can take my kids to a game, I can come for BP, I can watch with Riz. I want to see every angle of the game that I’ve never seen before. I feel like there’s so much I can learn in other ways that weren’t available to me. I will have to do something. I am 38 years old. …I need something everyday to keep me going. Not every day these days, I think – Heather would kill me. I need to be home for a bit. But I’m really interested in trying to find out what it is.

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Major League Baseball: Rortvedt from Verona traded to Yankees | Sports https://nyrenegades.com/major-league-baseball-rortvedt-from-verona-traded-to-yankees-sports/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://nyrenegades.com/major-league-baseball-rortvedt-from-verona-traded-to-yankees-sports/ Ben Rortvedt, a 24-year-old Verona Area High School alumnus in 2016, was traded to the New York Yankees from the Minnesota Twins on a five-man deal on Sunday, March 13. Rortvedt was part of a three-man group that included third baseman Josh Donaldson and shortstop Isiah Kiner-Falefa, the Twins traded to the Yankees for catcher […]]]>

Ben Rortvedt, a 24-year-old Verona Area High School alumnus in 2016, was traded to the New York Yankees from the Minnesota Twins on a five-man deal on Sunday, March 13.

Rortvedt was part of a three-man group that included third baseman Josh Donaldson and shortstop Isiah Kiner-Falefa, the Twins traded to the Yankees for catcher Gary Sanchez and third baseman Gio Urshela.

Rortvedt, a left-handed catcher, made his Major League Baseball debut last year with the Twins after former starting catcher Mitch Garver was injured.

In 39 games with Minnesota last year, Rortvedt hit .169 with three home runs, eight RBIs and eight runs scored. He had a .989 field percentage and kicked out 44% (7 of 16) of runners trying to steal.

Rortvedt, a 2016 Twins second-round pick, got his first start on April 30 against the Kansas City Royals and went 1-for-3 with an RBI brace and a run scored to help the Twins beat the Royals 9 – 1.

Rortvedt will compete for game time at catchewr with Kyle Higashioka.

In 325 minor league games over five seasons, Rortvedt has 21 home runs, 134 RBIs and a .241 batting average. It expelled 37% of riders trying to fly underage.

The Yankees have agreed to pay the remaining $50 million on Donaldson’s contract, which still has three years, according to an Associated Press report.

This is the second receiver traded by the Twins in two days. Minnesota traded Garver to the Texas Rangers for Kiner-Falefa on Saturday, March 12.

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Herz, Triantos, Alcántara, Howard, Nwogu, Davis, Bath, More https://nyrenegades.com/herz-triantos-alcantara-howard-nwogu-davis-bath-more/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 00:40:23 +0000 https://nyrenegades.com/herz-triantos-alcantara-howard-nwogu-davis-bath-more/ I love how close we get to the prospect side in spring training, given that the big leaguers aren’t participating. Don’t get me wrong, this part sucks. But it shifts the focus more to the minor league side, and we might as well enjoy seeing more of Mesa’s prospects than ever before. Among the recent […]]]>

I love how close we get to the prospect side in spring training, given that the big leaguers aren’t participating. Don’t get me wrong, this part sucks. But it shifts the focus more to the minor league side, and we might as well enjoy seeing more of Mesa’s prospects than ever before.

Among the recent visuals…

What a fun match between DJ Herz and James Triantos. Looks like this round went to Herz:

I love this look at the shift handle from Herz:

Kevin Alcántara seems to be educated a bit by Joe Nahas, who himself is a dormant prospect and is a bit more advanced than Alcántara:

Ed Howard and Jordan Nwogu taking swings, the mechanics of each still seem a bit (#NotAScout) to me:

Cristian Hernandez shoots:

If Max Bain is in slow motion, does that make him Min Bain:

Brennen Davis BP:

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Enderson Franco signs with Generales De Durango of the Mexican League https://nyrenegades.com/enderson-franco-signs-with-generales-de-durango-of-the-mexican-league/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 13:57:34 +0000 https://nyrenegades.com/enderson-franco-signs-with-generales-de-durango-of-the-mexican-league/ The Generales de Durango of the Mexican League announcement this week they signed right-handed Enderson Franco for the 2022 season. This will be the first spell in Mexico for the 29-year-old. Franco has quite a bit of big league experience, having played five games for the Giants in 2019. The Venezuela native had 5 1/3 […]]]>

The Generales de Durango of the Mexican League announcement this week they signed right-handed Enderson Franco for the 2022 season. This will be the first spell in Mexico for the 29-year-old.

Franco has quite a bit of big league experience, having played five games for the Giants in 2019. The Venezuela native had 5 1/3 two-run innings while averaging just under 96 mile/ h on his fastball, but he hasn’t connected at any other time in MLB. He spent a decade in the affiliate ranks, however, performing well enough up to Double-A but wrestling at the top level of the minors. In parts of three Triple-A campaigns, Franco boasts a 5.43 ERA with a below-average strikeout percentage of 19.5% but a solid walk rate of 7.4%.

While Franco has never missed many at bats, his combination of arm strength and batting experience caught the eye of the Korea Baseball Organization’s Lotte Giants last winter. He signed with the Busan-based club and spent the 2021 season in South Korea. Franco went 150 innings in the KBO and posted a 5.40 ERA with an 18.3% strikeout rate while walking an uncharacteristically 11.1% of opponents. Lotte brought in former big leaguers Charlie Barnes and Glenn Sparkman as their two foreign-born pitchers this offseason, replacing outgoing Franco and Dan Straily (who signed a minor league contract with the Diamondbacks).

As the generals noted in their announcement of Franco’s signing, he has experience in rotation and relief roles. He started 163 of his 183 minor league appearances, but came out of the bullpen in his five major league outings and worked in both capacities (27 starts, 10 relief appearances) with Lotte. last season. Franco has pitched seven games — all in relief — in Venezuelan Winter League action this offseason.

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Sailors open spring training complex to fans https://nyrenegades.com/sailors-open-spring-training-complex-to-fans/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 01:54:49 +0000 https://nyrenegades.com/sailors-open-spring-training-complex-to-fans/ PEORIA, Ariz. — After nearly two full years — 724 days to be exact — Mariners fans will once again be allowed to walk through the side door of the team’s spring training complex and wander into the backyards to watch daily baseball practices. The Mariners have announced that the complex will be open to […]]]>

PEORIA, Ariz. — After nearly two full years — 724 days to be exact — Mariners fans will once again be allowed to walk through the side door of the team’s spring training complex and wander into the backyards to watch daily baseball practices.

The Mariners have announced that the complex will be open to fans from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. MST, beginning Saturday morning and through the remainder of minor league spring training, April 3.

Fans have not been allowed access to the complex’s backfields since Major League Baseball canceled spring training on March 12, 2020, as a precaution due to COVID-19.

After playing a shortened 2020 season without fans for the regular season, MLB has decided not to allow fans into team complexes out of safety for players who often have to walk among fans to get to certain areas. of the complex.

With more than 90% of Mariners minor league players fully vaccinated and COVID-19 cases slowly declining, safety guidelines don’t have to be so strict. The Mariners haven’t issued any backcourt rules, but marked off areas — like in previous years — have been put in place to maintain distance for players.

Of course, these workouts will only feature minor league players. With MLB and the Major League Baseball Players Association locked in a bitter battle over a new collective bargaining agreement, and MLB owners instituting a player lockout Dec. 2, big league players and prospects minor leaguers on the 40-man roster, including top prospect Julio Rodriguez, are not allowed on the premises.

Still, for fans who are interested in the future of the organization and want to see big leaguers or potential stars up close, or for fans who just miss baseball, practices offer a chance to see baseball from close.

According to multiple outlets, the Mariners have one of the best farming systems in MLB — ranked No. 1 by Baseball America and No. 2 by The Athletic and Baseball Prospectus and No. 6 by ESPN — led by the ultra-talented Rodriguez , who looks like a budding star and is considered one of the top three prospects in all of baseball.

To protect him from a Rule 5 draft that may not happen now because of the lockout, the Mariners were forced to put Rodriguez on the 40-player roster in December, making him part of the MLBPA and ineligible. to participate.

But looking at the Mariners’ top 30 prospects in the organization by MLB Pipeline, only Rodriguez (#1), right-handed pitcher Matt Brash (#10), right-handed pitcher Juan Then (#14), outfielder Alberto Rodriguez (#21) and left-handed pitcher Aaron Fletcher (#23) are on the 40-man roster.

That leaves a slew of prospects in the camps, including top pitching prospect George Kirby, who is ranked 12th overall MLB prospect by Baseball America and leads a group of hard-hitting prospects. Fans will also be wowed by Noelvi Marte, the 20-year-old shortstop prospect that Baseball America ranks as the No. 18 prospect in baseball.

Kirby threw a fastball that hit 98 mph and a vanishing change during a live batting practice Thursday while Marte provided jaw-dropping moments during the current minor league minicamp, including including a laser one homer against the Padres in a scrimmage game.

Speaking of games, the minor league spring training games start March 14. But details as to the exact locations of the games and whether fans will be able to attend – they usually take place in the afternoon after morning practices – have yet to be determined by everyone. team.

Other Seattle top 30 prospects who will participate in practices:

  • No. 4: Emerson Hancock, RHP
  • No. 5: Harry Ford, C
  • No. 6: Zach DeLoach, DE
  • No. 7. Brandon Williamson, LHP
  • No. 8: Connor Phillips, RHP
  • No. 9: Levi Stoudt, RHP
  • No. 11: Edwin Arroyo, SS
  • No. 12: Adam Macko, LHP
  • No. 13: Milkar Perez, 3B
  • No. 15: Michael Morales, RHP
  • No. 16: Starlin Aguilar, 3B
  • No. 17: Gabriel Gonzalez, OF
  • No. 18: Isaiah Campbell, RHP
  • #19: Kaden Polcovich, SS-2B
  • No. 20: Bryce Miller, RHP
  • No. 22: Jonatan Clase, OF
  • No. 24: Sam Carlson, RHP
  • #25: Taylor Dollard, RHP
  • No. 26: Tyler Keenan, 1B-3B
  • No. 27: Cade Marlowe, OF
  • No. 28: Patrick Frick, SS
  • No. 29: Luis Bolivar, OF
  • No. 30: Juan Pinto, LHP

Also

The Mariners saw two players suspended for violating the minor league drug prevention and treatment program.

Right-handed pitcher Luiz Baez received a 60-game suspension for testing positive for Stanozolol, a performance-enhancing substance in violation of the program.

Bernie Martinez, also a right-handed pitcher, received an 80-game suspension after testing positive for LGD-4033 and Ostarine, performance-enhancing substances in violation of the program.

Baez, 21, was 2-2 with a 5.08 ERA in appearances for the Arizona Complex League Mariners in 2021. In 28 1/3 innings, he struck out 41 batters and walked 31.

Martinez, 25, pitched in 28 games for three different affiliates, posting a 4-2 record with a 7.31 ERA. In 56 2/3 innings, he struck out 52 batters with 23 walks. He pitched most of the season at High-A Everett, making 25 appearances where he had a 6.70 ERA. He was an undrafted free agent who left Incarnate Word University in 2019.

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In-Game Practice During Pirates Minor League Spring Training Practices – Pirates Prospects https://nyrenegades.com/in-game-practice-during-pirates-minor-league-spring-training-practices-pirates-prospects/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 19:17:21 +0000 https://nyrenegades.com/in-game-practice-during-pirates-minor-league-spring-training-practices-pirates-prospects/ Before the past two weeks, I haven’t covered the Pirates’ minor league spring training since 2019. The pandemic played a big part in that, but it was also different being back, due of all the changes made with the development of new Pirates players. system. Some things are always the same. Before leaving an empty […]]]>

Before the past two weeks, I haven’t covered the Pirates’ minor league spring training since 2019. The pandemic played a big part in that, but it was also different being back, due of all the changes made with the development of new Pirates players. system.

Some things are always the same. Before leaving an empty Pirate City lot yesterday, I spent time wandering around and thinking about covering spring training from those grounds for ten years before this one. I remember seeing Josh Bell hit a monster home run on the golf course beyond field two during one of his first batting practices as a professional hitter. I remembered tons of confrontations between Pirates Top Pitching Prospect and Pirates Top Hitting Prospect. I remembered that every video taken from field 4, the grass field, looked like it was shot on Mars.

Some things are always the same. The best part of this job is watching the MLB players of tomorrow develop early on in their journey. Someday I may remember the first time I watched Lonnie White Jr. or Braylon Bishop, or the battle between Austin Roberts and Henry Davis/Matt Fraizer. I posted a lot of videos on Twitter todayexcept for the latter, which will be released later this week.

There have been differences with the new player development system. One difference was the use of multiple pitchers during batting practice. The approach allows for a mix of delivery angles, as well as a mix of fast balls and slower spin. I wrote about this last week and received videos of this practice in action.

The interesting thing I spotted yesterday is that it’s not universal for all batting practices. The Pirates on Wednesday didn’t have all the batting practice stations set up for this, but did have one station with four interesting prospects selected for this drill. Those prospects were Braylon Bishop, Will Matthiessen, Jasiah Dixon and Lonnie White Jr. In each case, you can see why this drill – which focuses on recognizing the pitch and timing the fastball while being able to adapt to breaking things – could be a good choice for these players.

First off, Braylon Bishop has a crazy swing. Cody Potanko wrote about Bishop a few months ago, breaking down this violent swing action. This swing could lead to power numbers, but could also be likely to trick Bishop with off-speed stuff if he gets too aggressive. His swing looks like it could destroy some fastballs, with an extremely fast bat and a swing loop that’s a bit reminiscent of Ken Griffey Jr. If he can time it on the fastball, while still being able to adapt to the speed, he can be a dangerous hitter. The limited experience he has in pro ball has led to a .442 OPS in 26 at-bats, with eight strikeouts. You could say he’s a little raw right now.

Next up is Will Matthiessen, who had a solid second half with Greensboro, leading to 15 home runs and a .784 OPS this season. Matthiessen is huge, at 6′ 7″, but has a long, slower swing that could become a problem against a better mix of pitches. He knocked out 34.5% of the time in 2021 at High-A Greensboro, showing trends at three true results. He can make a few adjustments to reduce the speed of his large frame, like the adjustment he made to step five in the video above. He is a player who bats first, so limiting strikeouts and the impact of speed will be crucial for his development at the next level.

Jasiah Dixon had some trouble with the fastball machine. He was one of the fastest players in the system and has added muscle since being drafted in the 23rd round of 2019. He showed some speed between A-ball and FCL with 17 interceptions in 19 attempts the last year. He had serious contact issues, and it shows in the exercise above. This is the purpose of these exercises. Dixon doesn’t really benefit from a coach who returns batting practice fastballs to him in the middle. He benefits from a ridiculously fast throwing machine that alternates the angles of a slower spinning machine, giving him more drive that matches plays where he also struggles to make contact with the ball.

Finally, there’s Lonnie White Jr., who the Pirates signed for $1.5 million as a second-round prep outfielder in their impressive 2021 draft class. White Jr. showed some power right from his professional debut, hitting two doubles and two homers in 31 at-bats in the FCL. He had some swing and misfire issues, with a strikeout rate of 42.4%. He has a smooth swing and some raw power, but should be an early draft in his professional career, much like Bishop.

Spotlight on hacker perspectives

Vic Black created a video library to help teach the mechanics of pitching

Daily links

Hacker Perspectives

**John Dreker: Baseball America’s Top Shortstop Prospects

**John Dreker: Baseball America’s Top Outfield Prospect Ranking

** John Dreker: MLB cancels the first two series of the season

** Ethan Hullihen: MLB Lockdown Bargaining Week: Monday Notes Pt. 2

Elsewhere

**Cody Potanko: Here We Go Again: Death, Taxes and Rumors of Bryan Reynolds

**Jason Mackey: Bryan Reynolds on missing baseball, a bigger leadership role, the Pirates’ offseason and more

**Alex Stumpf: After a year of setbacks, Brennan Malone knows 2022 is vital

song of the day

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Why the Astros are auditioning minor league prospects for different positions https://nyrenegades.com/why-the-astros-are-auditioning-minor-league-prospects-for-different-positions/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 00:57:04 +0000 https://nyrenegades.com/why-the-astros-are-auditioning-minor-league-prospects-for-different-positions/ WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — The positional addition is the Astros’ latest innovation in player development, providing a way to increase the value of some of their most athletic prospects. An organization without a lot of high-end talent continues to tinker with some of its prized ones, dividing time between their natural position and its […]]]>

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — The positional addition is the Astros’ latest innovation in player development, providing a way to increase the value of some of their most athletic prospects.

An organization without a lot of high-end talent continues to tinker with some of its prized ones, dividing time between their natural position and its polar opposite.

The tactic confuses some but favors the player’s long-term future over possible short-term setbacks. Three spring trainings ago, when reporters spotted Myles Straw taking ground balls at shortstop, former manager AJ Hinch joked “this isn’t a lab.” That season, he threw Straw 14 times at shortstop in the absence of Carlos Correa.

“When we get into these things, everyone understands the concepts and the ideas behind them,” said field coordinator Jason Bell. “It’s not a lab, and we don’t do it with everyone.

“I think it might seem like it if every player did that, but I think our organization does a good job of communicating those things holistically. Coaches often like it because it gives them a challenge. They take great pride in trying to make a center back a shortstop because it’s not an easy thing to do and it’s rare.

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Procrastination breeds absurdity when it comes to Major League Baseball labor negotiations https://nyrenegades.com/procrastination-breeds-absurdity-when-it-comes-to-major-league-baseball-labor-negotiations/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 12:00:25 +0000 https://nyrenegades.com/procrastination-breeds-absurdity-when-it-comes-to-major-league-baseball-labor-negotiations/ LINCROFT, NJ – JANUARY 28: An official MLB baseball sits above a base used by MLB play with a … [+] lock and chain around him to represent the lockdown between Major League Baseball (MLB) and the Major League Baseball Players Association (MLBPA) on January 28, 2022. (Photo by Rich Graessle/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images) […]]]>

Sand crosses the hourglass for Major League Baseball. February 28and The deadline for an agreement on a new collective bargaining agreement seems unlikely, which will delay spring training and the start of the 2022 regular season. A spokesperson for Major League Baseball confirmed the obvious by stating that regular season ball games would be canceled and not rescheduled to a later date. Ballplayers would also start losing paychecks. According to research by the Associated Press, baseball players could lose $20.5 million every day regular season ball games are canceled due to the lockdown.

Major League Baseball and the Major League Baseball Players Association (MLBPA) must quickly find an accelerated path to resolving key economic issues. One of the main objectives of the negotiations was the compensation of young ballplayers during their pre-arbitration years. Currently, Major League Baseball has increased the amount of the pre-arbitration bonus pool from $15 million to $20 million. They remain committed to distributing the money only to the top 30 ballplayers eligible for pre-arbitration. The MLBPA wants to see the pool set at $115 million and distributed to the top 150 ballplayers eligible for pre-arbitration.

In regards to creating a draft lottery like the National Basketball Association, Major League Baseball has expressed a desire to adopt a system that focuses on the top four picks. The MLBPA would like to see a draft lottery that incorporates the top seven picks. By comparison, the National Basketball Association draft lottery only includes the top four picks. Competitive integrity is a serious concern for the MLBPA and so ball clubs are deeply committed to winning, regardless of their record or standings position. A logical compromise might be to create a draft lottery for the top five picks.

Major League Baseball has decided to withdraw its proposal asking the MLBPA for the option of reducing the size of minor league rosters. The national reserve roster is a concern given Major League Baseball’s desire for flexibility regarding the number of minor league ballplayers a major league ball club can have under contract. Although this topic has been temporarily removed from the negotiations, it will likely be revisited at some point in the future.

The number of times a ballplayer could be optioned in a season has been a topic of interest. Major League Baseball favored a maximum of five times but decided to remove this element from its proposal. The MLBPA has expressed comfort with a maximum of four times per season. There has been a focus on quality of life issues for ballplayers given the constant back and forth between major and minor league ball clubs.

The MLBPA believes there should be significant changes to the minimum wage structure and how quickly ballplayers can get to arbitration. Their latest proposal calls for an initial minimum wage of $775,000 with increases of $30,000 each season. If the collective agreement spans five seasons, the minimum wage for the 2026 season as requested by the MLBPA would be $895,000.

Major League Baseball countered with a $10,000 increase each season to their existing proposal. In 2022, the minimum wage would be $640,000 and by the 2026 season it would increase to $680,000. Note the minimum wage differences in Major League Baseball compared to the National Basketball Association, National Football League, and National Hockey League. Currently, Major League Baseball lags behind each of these leagues when it comes to minimum salaries for their ballplayers.

In terms of Super Two eligibility, the MLBPA made another slight tweak to its proposal. Instead of extending arbitration eligibility to 80% of ballplayers between two and three years of service, the MLBPA would be comfortable at 75%. Under the recently expired collective agreement, it was 22%. Ideally, Major League Baseball would like to reduce arbitration eligibility while the MLBPA is aggressively looking for ways to expand it. One has to wonder if Major League Baseball has genuine concerns about extending arbitration eligibility to more ballplayers, as it could result in additional hearings with umpires ruling in favor of ballplayers. ball.

Nothing significant was achieved after three afternoons of collective bargaining. In fact, procrastination has become wacky in nature. Incremental progress would have worked well in December and January if the negotiations had taken place every five days and if there had been a constant exchange of proposals. Major League Baseball initiated the lockout and now they are threatening to cancel regular season ball games in days. The only clarity we have is that neither side is acting with a great sense of urgency and serious damage is being done to baseball’s heartbeat.

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Florida businesses and MLB fans face delayed spring training https://nyrenegades.com/florida-businesses-and-mlb-fans-face-delayed-spring-training/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 09:01:58 +0000 https://nyrenegades.com/florida-businesses-and-mlb-fans-face-delayed-spring-training/ “What’s going on?” Scott, Parker’s father, shouted to a familiar park employee. Short answer: nobody knows, and everyone has been instructed not to say anything. “Updates on lockdown? asked Parker, who is 25 and is on match day staff at Roger Dean. Short answer: No. Absolutely none. The story continues under the ad “The anxiety […]]]>

“What’s going on?” Scott, Parker’s father, shouted to a familiar park employee. Short answer: nobody knows, and everyone has been instructed not to say anything.

“Updates on lockdown? asked Parker, who is 25 and is on match day staff at Roger Dean. Short answer: No. Absolutely none.

“The anxiety turned into frustration,” said Parker, a longtime St. Louis Cardinals fan. ” I did not know [the lockout] was going to be 81 days and counting.

He sensed a certain judgment in a few beats of silence. He looked down and laughed.

“Yeah, of course I counted,” admitted Parker. “Spring training is my favorite time of year.”

In Jupiter, as in the cities of Florida and Arizona, he is not alone. MLB has postponed the start of spring training games until at least March 5. The team’s full workouts haven’t started either. Around Roger Dean this week, fans and business owners are bracing for a longer waiting pattern. And it all comes after spring training was wiped out by the coronavirus pandemic midway through 2020, then delayed by fear and attendance limits in 2021.

This spring was supposed to be a sharp break in the right direction. Jupiter, and specifically the community surrounding Roger Dean, where the Cardinals and Miami Marlins train and have minor league teams, felt like it was deserved.

“It’s really devastating,” said Dennis Witkowski, owner of the Stadium Grill, a popular spot right across from the ballpark, for 20 years. “It’s just a punch. We rely on spring training every year. Our lives and our business revolve around it. Florida remains a wonderful place to spend the winter. We still have that tourism, but you can’t replace baseball fans.

On Sunday, discussions at the Stadium Grill ranged from the Daytona 500 to a recent Elton John tribute concert in a part of town called Downtown Abacoa, where the restaurant is at the center of a mall near Roger Dean. The entire establishment, including a bar, two dining rooms and a large outdoor patio, had less than half a dozen customers. Televisions were turned to NFL Network and English football. And on Monday, at the end of the holiday weekend, Witkowski only scheduled one server and two cooks for the lunch crew.

If the Cardinals and Marlins workouts were in full swing, he would have had 13 servers and seven cooks. So while baseball can be substituted in conversation and on television, there’s no sub for its bottom line.

“It’s a huge financial impact for me because that’s when we cash in for the leaner months,” said Vicki Parmelee, owner of Jumby Bay Island Grill, a block from Stadium Grill. , for 18 years. “But I feel even worse for new companies that have come here and are really excited, like, ‘This is my first big spring training. We haven’t been through this yet. And then they get this.

David Schroeder and his business partner, Thomas Op’t Holt, fall into this category. They opened The Brick & Barrel Gastro Pub, across from Jumby Bay, in June 2020. They have since opened two other locations in downtown Abacoa: Duke’s Tacos & Margs and Tavern Pi. Schroeder says, “The The stakes are much higher for us now.” Last March was Brick & Barrel’s best month yet, making Schroeder and Op’t Holt giddy with how this year looks.

“We’ve been talking about it for literally a year,” Op’t Holt said as he sat at the bar on Tuesday. Their plan was to add staff and open for lunch a few hours earlier than usual once games started. They have tasted their premium whiskey and hope to find buyers. “Closing spring training in March would be worse for us than another covid outbreak, like they announced the zeta variant was coming. It would be so bad.

“Traders here are pretty tight – we all talk a lot,” Schroeder added. “The number I’ve heard is that March is about 25% of business for the whole year. I’m not sure it’s that high for us. But even if it’s 15-20%, it’s important for any restaurant or store to miss. … You can feel it here when it rains during spring training. If it’s raining or something, it’s like, ‘Oh, man, we got 12 guys working.’ So having no games at all would be a disaster. It’s like a very, very long rain.

Lloyd Hyten, a diehard Cardinals fan from Dexter, Mo., has attended 17 of the last 19 spring workouts at Jupiter. He and his now-retired wife have spent two full months here over the past six years, missing no exposure from Cardinals to Roger Dean. On their daily walk around the stadium on Monday, Hyten tapped the only open wicket. He put his hands around his eyes, trying to block out the sun’s glare and see inside.

No one came, despite an illuminated “Open” sign. Hyten wanted to ask if fans could watch the Cardinals minor leaguers practice. He promises he could get by if the lockdown continues, whether that means obsessing over prospects or spending more days at the beach. At a nearby door, free copies of the Palm Beach Florida Weekly were stacked in a newspaper box. Go back and the last issue contained 213 “Things To Do” through the end of March. None mentioned “baseball” or “spring training.”

Once Hyten left for the afternoon, a pair of children, no older than 12, rode their bikes to the same ticket office and parked. MLB officials hovered directly above them, preparing for another round of negotiations that saw incremental progress. This time a woman was sitting behind the window. The boys asked if the games would start on March 6. She shrugged, offering no reassurance or information.

“Why don’t they play? one of the boys asked as they got back on their bikes.

“Something with a lockout,” said the other, raising his kickstand to pedal away from the park.

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The Milwaukee Bears played in the National Negro League https://nyrenegades.com/the-milwaukee-bears-played-in-the-national-negro-league/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 02:45:00 +0000 https://nyrenegades.com/the-milwaukee-bears-played-in-the-national-negro-league/ MILWAUKEE — A University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee doctoral student is working to preserve the history of the city’s 1920s black professional baseball team. A love for baseball and history led Ken Bartelt to discover the history of the Milwaukee Bears. “They had a difficult season with 14 wins and 52 losses and one draw, so they […]]]>

MILWAUKEE — A University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee doctoral student is working to preserve the history of the city’s 1920s black professional baseball team.

A love for baseball and history led Ken Bartelt to discover the history of the Milwaukee Bears.

“They had a difficult season with 14 wins and 52 losses and one draw, so they weren’t really successful,” Bartelt recalled.

In 1923, this group of black professional baseball players were in a league of their own.

“The Bears were part of one of the most important moments in Negro League history. They played in one of the very first games led by black men,” Bartelt said.

The team had no home field and had to rent an athletic park, better known now as Borchert Field, when the all-white Milwaukee Braves were not playing.

“A lot of players were from Chicago, some had played with Rube Foster, some were from New Orleans as well,” Bartelt said.

Bartelt could only find one photo showing some of the original team members, but in recent years the Milwaukee Brewers, who were a minor league in 1923, have paid tribute to the Bears in wearing their throwback jerseys during the regular season. season.

“These people desperately wanted to play a game that they loved professionally, and they brought a lot of joy to their community. I think that sometimes gets lost,” Bartelt said.

Bob Kendrick, president of the National Negro League Museum in Kansas City Missouri, is determined to ensure that the stories of these players and the Negro League are preserved.

“When you delved into that story, you learned that the story is so much bigger than the game of baseball,” he said. “It’s a story about the importance of economic empowerment, it’s a story about an unprecedented level of leadership and ultimately, it’s the story of America’s social advancement.”

Both Kendrick and Barelt agree, just as important as Jackie Robinson was to breaking the color barrier in 1947, as was the existence of the Negro league and teams like the Milwaukee Bears.

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